Glen Rock Before the Duttons

An article published in the Boston Journal on March 23, 1910, p. 8, noted that Benjamin F. Dutton’s home in Malden, Glen Rock, “is one of the most attractive estates in New England.” The article went on to say that the main house where Benjamin Dutton resided “would remind one of a castle [and] was built about forty years ago by George Lochman, who represented in Boston extensive coal interests in Pennsylvania.”

This would suggest that the house was built sometime around 1870. Benjamin Dutton purchased the property from Lochman on October 1, 1878, for $30,000. The purchase consisted of 50.75 acres of land, the main house, and several other buildings. Dutton would eventually expand the estate through the purchase of more land, and over the years he improved the main house, constructed houses for his children, and built the large three-story barn for his horses.

Stephen Jerome of Boston (who owns the Dutton commemorative plate described in my blog post of September 2, 2014) recently sent me two clippings he found in the Boston Daily Evening Traveller newspaper, dated in 1871 and 1872, respectively. The first clipping indicates that Lochman desired to sell the property as early as 1871 and provides a detailed description of the house and grounds before Benjamin Dutton took ownership. Perhaps this was how he first learned about the Glen Rock estate.

Lochman_snagit

The “cottage,” located “a few hundred feet lower down in the valley,” probably refers to the house later occupied by Benjamin’s eldest daughter Ellen Dutton, who married musician Joseph B. Claus. In early Malden city directories, Ellen’s house was called “Glen Rock Cottage.”

The “Lofty Rock Summit” undoubtedly refers to Tea Rock, which hovered above the estate and had a gazebo, or summer house, built at the top.  This photo shows the view from Tea Rock today, showing the city of Boston in the distance.

TeaRockView

On June 7, 1872, nearly a year after publishing his ad to sell the property, George Lochman auctioned the contents of the house. The auction notice, the second clipping sent to me by Stephen Jerome, was published in the Daily Evening Traveller on June 3, 1872. While the paper is faded and difficult to read in parts (especially the names of the artists), the notice gives an interesting insight into Lochman’s lifestyle and interests.

Lochman2Capture

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